Tag Archives: Donald Trump[

Weekend Reader: ‘Our New Head of State’

I like this composite article about Trump because it cites and links the original sources.

Why does it fit on “Princeton” comment? I met the author, Maxwell Anderson,maxwell at Princeton University’s EQuad, at the Friend Center a couple of years ago. When I find the picture and can remember exactly what event, I’ll post it, but he’s worth reading.

Each week, for this ‘deep thinker’s guide to modern culture,’ he draws from multiple sources to summarize a different topic. What is his business model? That’s another story.  

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Post-election Rx for the Workplace

Tom Sullivan, in a Princeton Partnersullivans column, had some good ideas for how to deal with post-election stress in the workplace. “Use your company as an agent for change,” he says. Here is a five-step strategy, and for details  on the first three, click through to the post/ 

  1. Find a favorite issue:
  2. Identify a common cause:
  3. Share ideas:
  4. Take the first step: This can be scary, because inertia is hard to overcome. You can overcome that inertia if you have a strong team willing to take that first step together.
  5. Be humble: Be gracious and helpful when you engage with others who are already engaged in the cause you seek to assist. Ask questions, offer assistance and recognize that you will be more effective if your primary strategy is to build trusting relationships.

 

David Sedaris & Patrick Murray

When David Sedaris launched his annual speaking tour tonight, standing room only at McCarter (Wednesday), the line for book signing snaked around corners. Asked about the election, his off-the-cuff answer about Trump, paraphrased:

“It’s as if he looked at who wasn’t being pandered to — the stupidest people in America weren’t being pandered to.” Sedaris said, pointing out that at least Trump gives plain answers rather than politician-runaround. “I think he dominated the news so long that people were tired of him.”

Patrick Murray will opine on the same subject on Thursday, April 7 at the Princeton Regional Chamber. To find out what folks are really thinking about politicians like Trump, says Murray, eavesdrop in a diner. Murray is quoted  in  Michele Alperin’s U.S. 1 cover story here. Murray heads the Monmouth University Polling Institute, which is still in the game of political prognosticating, an arena in which — surprisingly — Gallup has left. Here is why.

For this occasion, Sedaris wore culottes. What would Trump say?